Washi Tape Gallery Wall

There's something refreshing about an easy and affordable way to display artwork and mementos.  If you're on a tight budget, live in a space where you're not able to easily poke holes in walls, have sloped ceilings or awkwardly shaped rooms, or work in a spot where you're always changing things up, the washi tape gallery wall can be an amazing way to add colour and interest to your space. Plus, I really love that it's a casual look and doesn't feel too precious.  

You really don't need more than a roll or two (I get most of mine at DeSerres because I like purchasing individual rolls rather than a pre-packaged collection), a pair of scissors, and whatever works you want to pin up. It's really as easy as that, but there a couple of things I'll mention that are pretty important:

A few things to keep in mind

  1. ensure you're working with washi tape (I've made the mistake of assuming similar looking tape was of the washi variety before, but it was decorator's tape, which is far less delicate and does not easily come off (it will destroy your prints); and
  2. you probably won't want to use washi tape on any expensive or irreplaceable pieces. This method is better served for those pieces that are cute but don't really need to live protected in full-time in a frame. 

I recently stayed up late on what I'll affectionately call a creative binge, where I couldn't stop myself from making one collage after another. The next morning as I was cleaning up the remnants left behind, I quickly realized that I had no plan for what to do with the little masterpieces I had made. Realizing how much I enjoyed putting them together, I figured I'd display them on a blank wall in my office that has slanted ceilings and a large window. The only risk was wasting some tape at less than $5 a pop.

I'll get more into this topic in a future post, but many of my favourite gallery walls include different types of items. This endeavour was completely impromptu, but it was clear to me that I didn't want to take things too seriously, so I also grabbed some childhood photos of me, my husband, and our siblings, some fortunes from takeout meals, postcards, and so on. It was so much fun bringing it all together in the 15 or 20 mins it took, and it's a gallery that can grow easily across the room and change with my mood. 

A mixture of collages, childhood photos, engagement photos, postcards, Etsy prints, and leftover scraps from paint projects

A mixture of collages, childhood photos, engagement photos, postcards, Etsy prints, and leftover scraps from paint projects

I opted to use tape in one colour to keep the messy look feeling a bit more cohesive

I opted to use tape in one colour to keep the messy look feeling a bit more cohesive

Collages and fortune-cookie-fortunes surround the office window, which is centred below a sloped ceiling

Collages and fortune-cookie-fortunes surround the office window, which is centred below a sloped ceiling

More personal touches include old love notes, a petition to keep my then-boyfriend's (now husband's) moustache, and tearaways from a sign at my previous workplace

More personal touches include old love notes, a petition to keep my then-boyfriend's (now husband's) moustache, and tearaways from a sign at my previous workplace

 

Other applications I love:

Below are some other galleries that range from big to small, and that stand out based on the artwork chosen and the feeling they evoke. Such a simple roll of tape can instantly take a wall from drab and boring to full of life and personality, and work can easily be swapped out and rearranged without worry. 

Via  HonestlyWTF   This unexpected bathroom gallery uses fun prints and washi tape to create a  framed effect  ☝🏼

Via HonestlyWTF

This unexpected bathroom gallery uses fun prints and washi tape to create a framed effect ☝🏼

Via  Design Sponge   For a totally different vibe, I love this more traditional approach using all  black tape and portraits  ☝🏼

Via Design Sponge

For a totally different vibe, I love this more traditional approach using all black tape and portraits ☝🏼

Via  MilK Decoration   Another shot of black tape on a white wall, but this one feels much different using a variety of inspired  magazine tear-outs.  Cute and economical to boot ☝🏼

Via MilK Decoration

Another shot of black tape on a white wall, but this one feels much different using a variety of inspired magazine tear-outs. Cute and economical to boot ☝🏼

Via  @designlovefest   I love when pink is balanced out with obscure art and less frilly accents. This gallery acts as an inspiration board against a colourful background, perfect in an office setting ☝🏼

Via @designlovefest

I love when pink is balanced out with obscure art and less frilly accents. This gallery acts as an inspiration board against a colourful background, perfect in an office setting ☝🏼

Via  Me and Alice   This easy-peasy effortless look feels classic and sophisticated:  a black and white   grid spaced evenly  atop shiplap ☝🏼

Via Me and Alice

This easy-peasy effortless look feels classic and sophisticated: a black and white grid spaced evenly atop shiplap ☝🏼

Via  Pinterest   For a fun, lowkey vibe, sometimes keeping it small and simple with  different   coloured   tape  is the right move ☝🏼

Via Pinterest

For a fun, lowkey vibe, sometimes keeping it small and simple with different coloured tape is the right move ☝🏼

Via my big sister, Laura, from her Toronto apartment  When faced with  concrete and textured walls , washi tape can be an easy solution to add some interest. Play with straight lines, taped corners, or keep it hidden with tape only on the back ☝🏼

Via my big sister, Laura, from her Toronto apartment

When faced with concrete and textured walls, washi tape can be an easy solution to add some interest. Play with straight lines, taped corners, or keep it hidden with tape only on the back ☝🏼

My favourite part about the washi tape gallery is that it acts as a really simple way to play with artwork and practice implementing a salon wall with zero commitment or hassle, and with seriously minimal expense. It's an ideal way to decorate in temporary spaces, and there's something comforting about eliminating the risk of poking a hole in the "wrong" spot, which means there's more freedom to take some more quirky and whimsical chances with your display 

DIYMaia LaPierreComment